I have a spouse, relative, friend who is an active alcoholics. How can I help?

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I have a spouse, relative, friend who is an active alcoholics. How can I help?

Category : FAQ

I have a spouse, relative, friend who is an active alcoholics. How can I help?

The above question more often comes in the form “how can I get my spouse to wise up and quit drinking ?”. Since alcoholics are people who have an illness in which they have lost the ability to control their drinking, you are not likely to be able to control it for them. However, acquiring knowledge about alcoholism, A.A. etc., will allow you to communicate more effectively with the alcoholic when the opportunity arises. You might want to try one or more of the following ideas: Offer to help the alcoholic get in touch with A.A., explaining that this will entail no obligation to become a member. Offer to attend a few A.A. open meetings with the alcoholic, for informational reasons. Explain to individuals that only they themselves know whether they are really alcoholics and suggest a talk with someone from A.A. to help clarify the problem. Talk to the alcoholic always in terms of suggestion, avoiding threats or duress. Rationalization and denial are a frustrating aspect of the disease of alcoholism. Recovery from active alcoholism depends strongly upon the alcoholic coming to his/her own decision about the desire for help. Become acquainted with A.A. literature, particularly the book Alcoholics Anonymous, which is generally accepted as A.A.’s basic text, and is available for purchase at most local groups. A.A. does not focus on the non-alcoholic, but there is an entirely separate fellowship known as the Alanon Family Groups that is composed of adults and teens whose lives are or have been affected by another person’s drinking. Alanon has an answering service in the K-W area (519-742-6921).


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Big Book Quotes

"He does absurd, incredible, tragic things while drinking. " (page 31)